RSS

Basic Gene Structure

26 Sep

It’s tempting to think of genes as simply a series of nucleotides beginning with a START codon and ending with one of the three STOP codons. However, there are a number of additional regulatory elements that must be present in order for a gene to be transstopstartcribed and translated appropriately.

Transcription is regulated by signals for the DNA-dependent RNA Polymerase ( or simply ‘RNA Polymerase’) to attach and detatch from the DNA in the nucleus.

The attachment point is known as the promoter, and ‘Initiation’ of transcription is characterized by the recruitment of the RNA polymerase to the DNA upstream of the coding sequence. Polymerase engagement unwinds the DNA allowing for recruitment of ribonucleotides and the start of RNA synthesis (Elongation). There may be a number of false starts until a sufficiently long RNA is made to stabilize the enzyme, and even after elongation begins, it may stall and restart until the polymerase reaches a termination signal. There are a number of different kinds of termination signals, but they all occur downstream of the stop codon and serve to disengage the polymerase from the DNA (Termination) so that it is free to recycle back to the promoter.

There are some key differences between the ways that prokaryotes and eukaryotes perform these operations, but all the above elements occur in each system. The key to understanding this clearly is that transcription must occur before translation, and therefore, the transcribed region must have all the translated region within it. This sounds obvious, but can be helpful in order to envision the gene correctly as a physical object.BasicGeneStructure

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on September 26, 2018 in Uncategorized

 

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

 
%d bloggers like this: